MORSE v. FREDERICK - students rights not coextensive with adults

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Does the First Amendment protect students’ cyberspeech? - National Constitution Center students rights not coextensive with adults


In New Jersey v. T.L.O., 469 U.S. 325, 340-342 (1985), we reaffirmed that the constitutional rights of students in public school are not automatically coextensive with the rights of adults in other settings. As cogently expressed by Judge Newman, "the First Amendment gives a high school student the classroom right to wear Tinker's armband, but.

Jun 09, 2006 · Three years later, the Rehnquist court ruled in Hazelwood School District v. Kuhlmeier that the First Amendment rights of students are not “coextensive” with those of adults, because schools are not traditional public fora in the same sense as are public parks and streets.

These two roles can come into conflict, but the Court said that students in public school are not able to assert the same rights as adults in other settings. Rules were established for searches, such as reasonableness, not excessively intrusive, and related to the offense that is being investigated.

First Amendment and Rights of Accused. STUDY. PLAY. Bill of Rights. Frasers holding demonstrates that the constitutional rights of students in public school are not automatically coextensive with the rights of adults in other settings. Morse v. Frederick.